Calcio Italia (Italy Soccer)
Browse below our collection of photos of Italian Soccer (Calcio Italia). We have photos of fans and the best players and teams in all of Italy.   This includes photos of the 2006 World Cup Championship Italy team that consisted of the following players that have been immortalized since their championship win: Gianluigi Buffon, Cristian Zaccardo, Fabio Grosso, Daniele De Rossi, Fabio Cannavaro (...
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Insightful and ingenious quotes have originated in Italy for centuries. Below is a list of some of our favorite Italian quotations. We are always looking to add more quotes to this page, so if you would like to share a famous Italian quote with us, please use our Contact Us form. “Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” Leonardo da Vinci - Italian draftsman, Painter, Sculptor, Archit...
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Italians Engage in Self Help Wealth Redistribution: Rob Banks!

Posted By: The Annotico Report, Italia Mia Network on July 15, 2010 in Annotico Report, Italy - Comments: No Comments »

The many who have long known your  Banker is a rapacious, deceitful, fraud with a smiling face, have now been joined by those who saw clearly what the Great Mortgage Fraud Bubble (created by Bank "No Doc" and "Liar Loans", and "Promises of Refinance", when "Low Introductory Rates" Expired) produced, and the 30% Interest Rate on Credit Cards,  and the Tsunami of "Extra Fees" who were then Bailed Out by Taxpayer Money!!!!!!!!
 
When these Financial:Behemoths  BUY  the "Little Guys" Congressman, then what's a person to do???? ... Self Help.
Who would root vs Robin Hood on behalf of the Serfs in his battle vs the Heartless "Nobles" ????
 
Are we Ready for the Revolution that Jefferson said was periodically necessary in order to preserve Democracy with the blood of Tyrants and Patriots?

Mother Robbing Bank Shows Why Italy Leads EU Thefts
Bloomberg News;  Business Week; July 15, 2010  Italy’s biggest banks rank no higher than ninth in Europe by market value. They come in first by another yardstick: robberies.
Heists at Italian banks accounted for almost half of all thefts in the European Union last year, according to a June 30 report by banking union FIBA. The report concluded that Italian banks have too much cash on hand at too many branches.
Italy recorded 1,744 bank robberies last year, more than six times the number in Germany and 20 times the U.K. figure, FIBA reported. Italian banks lost 36.8 million euros ($46.8 million) to thieves last year, according to data compiled by Italian banking association ABI.
“The less that cash circulates in branches, the fewer robberies we’ll have," said Pierfrancesco Gaggi, the Rome-based head of infrastructure at ABI, in an interview.
The abundance of branches in neighborhoods with minimal police presence makes Italian banks easy picking for thieves, said Alessandro Spaggiari, FIBA’s national secretary in Rome.
Intesa Sanpaolo SpA, Italy’s biggest bank by branches, has 5,921 outlets in its home market, more than twice as many as France’s BNP Paribas SA and about 1,000 more than Banco Santander SA has in its Spanish network.
Santander is Europe’s second-largest bank by market value after London-based HSBC Holdings Plc and Paris-based BNP Paribas is third, while Milan-based Intesa places 14th, data compiled by Bloomberg show. UniCredit SpA is Italy’s biggest bank, ranking ninth in the region after Zurich-based Credit Suisse Group AG.
Surveillance Breakdown
Italian banks spend more than 700 million euros a year on anti-theft equipment such as closed-circuit cameras and alarms, Spaggiari said. Little of the funds go to smaller branches, since those locations have relatively limited amounts of cash, he said.
That suits crooks, as most Italian bank robberies are small-time jobs, with two out of three heists bringing in less than 15,000 euros, according to a June 10 report from the ABI. Many of the perpetrators are amateurs, often armed with little more than knives.
A 41-year-old mother robbed three banks in the Turin area in one day in May, while her seven-month-old infant waited in the car.
“I haven’t got a steady job," the Turin thief told police when she was arrested after her fourth attempted holdup of the day. "I didn’t know how to get by with a small child." Police have declined to disclose her identity.
Poor and Homeless
With unemployment approaching 9 percent and the economy only now emerging from its worst recession since World War II, robberies by “desperate people" are on the increase, said Mario Furlan, founder of Milan-based CityAngel, a non-profit organization that helps the poor and homeless. In many underprivileged neighborhoods, robbing a bank isn’t even considered a crime, Furlan said.
The ABI is trying to get Italians, who like using cash, to switch to credit cards and other non-cash instruments to improve security and bring Italy in line with the rest of Europe. Italians make an average 66 non-cash transactions per person every year, about one third of the euro-zone average and four times less than in the U.K, according to a Bank of Italy report.

Irish Gastonia County Commissioner thinks using Guidos and Goombas slurs is OK

Note to Tom Keigher, Gaston County Commission;  Please SEE :  Racial Slur DataBase: http://gyral.blackshell.com/names.html
Guido, Goomba, Dago, Guinea, Wop, are ALL considered ITALIAN SLURS
As a Southerner,you might want to also avoid Red Neck, Cracker, InBred, Honky, Cowfuck,Trailer Trash, Gomers,Hayseed, Hick, Muppetfucker.
For your Info the following are IRISH SLURS
Mick = Many Irish surnames begin with "Mc" or "Mac." Irish are also named after the famed Michael Collins, making Michael (Mick) a very common name, therefore Not derogatory. 
Narrow Back = Heard used on jobsites around NYC amongst the many Irish immigrant workers and every time one Irish immigrant calls another this slur it has always ended in a bloody fistfight.
Patty/Paddy = Derogatory slur word for Irish people. Used mainly in Britain. Similar negativity connotations as "nigger". Comes from St. Patrick.
Potato Head = The Irish grow potatoes
Pogue = Possibly from Irish Gaelic "pog mi hone", meaning "kiss my arse".
Shant = Poor Irish People. Derived from the shacks they lived in -- the shanty.
Spudnigger = Irish/Potato relationship. Also Spudfucker.

Perhaps your associates will find it amusing to refer to YOU in the future with some of these "affectionate" and  "playful"  Irish terms.
But I would seriously suggest you not "affectionately" refer to any of your associates  as "kikes" "hebes", or "shylocks"
It is rather amusing how one of your own describe Gastonia. http://charlotte.creativeloafing.com/gyrobase/signs_of_life_in_gastonia/Content?oid=209901
"Gastonia has the reputation of being home to a backward population of illiterate rednecks, murderers, thieves, and bail bondsman, no-account vagrants, NASCAR junkies, and even the odd purveyor of crystal meth. For many the use of the words "Gastonia" and "Culture" in the same sentence is an oxymoron - - with an emphasis on moron."


Attorney Slams Gaston Commissioner for Ethnic Slur
Gaston Gazette; Michael Barrett; July 13, 2010
To Gaston County N.C. (adjacent to Charlotte) Commissioner Tom Keigher, ther're playful, harmless and often affectionate idioms for Italian Americans he's heard all his life.
To Gastonia attorney Arcangela Mazzariello, they're ethnic slurs that cut deep, conjuring up negative stereotypes of mobsters and lower-class, urban Italian Americans.
Slang references such as "guido" and "gumba" are rampant in pop culture, movies and television shows such as MTV's wildly popular "Jersey Shore." But many Italian Americans consider such "G-words" a smear. And when Keigher typed both terms Monday in a post on a social networking site, then declined to apologize for it, Mazzariello said her blood boiled.
"He's a county commissioner. Is he an idiot?" said Mazzariello. "Why is it OK to call anybody an ethnic anything? Nobody's going to use the N-word or the F-word like that. I'm not going to let him use the G-word."
In a world of things being blown out of proportion, this may take the cake, Keigher said.
"It was having fun," said the Gastonia Township Republican." It's just a stupid little tongue-in-cheek thing. I never would think those are racial slurs."
Playful or hurtful?
Mazzariello and Keigher previously served together on a nonprofit board. They are friends on Facebook, where they communicate sporadically.
In a post on her Facebook page Monday, Mazzariello referenced her correct prediction that Spain would win the World Cup, and suggested those who bet against her needed to "pay up."
After another friend suggested Mazzariello would send a man named Stormano Forbessioni to "collect," Keigher commented, "If not him, then some other guido or gumba!"
Mazzariello informed Keigher that she found the term offensive, and that it could cause people not to vote for him in the next election. Had he apologized, she would have let it drop, she said.
But Keigher replied with playful sarcasm, "I'm a shakin?! Please don't inform the tens of thousands of Italians here in Gaston. They will do me in!"
He also justified his use of the terms by posting, "Well, I'm Irish, and I guess I'm not liberal or touchy enough to get upset if someone calls me a mick!"
Keigher is in his 12th year as a Gaston County commissioner. He faces no Democratic opposition in November and is virtually assured of being elected to a fourth term.
Still, if he seriously thought the terms "guido" or "gumba" were offensive, he argues, he would never have been so casual with them.
"In an elected position, why would I put something like that out there for the world to see if I thought it was?" he said.
Differing views
Mazzariello is an Italian American through and through. Her middle names are Gabriella Maria. Her parents emigrated from Italy and arrived in the United States through Ellis Island, and Mazzariello grew up in New York City before moving here in 1995.
Her family includes judges, writers, poets and doctors. But all her life, Mazzariello said she has bristled at the mafia stereotype that Italians are saddled with.
"From the time I was a child, I fought the river of discrimination from people making references to being in the mafia, being a guido," she said. "I am hypersensitive to it, maybe because my parents had an accent and I was raised hearing people make fun of people with accents."
Keigher said he grew up in New Jersey surrounded by Italians who called one another gumbas, and Guido was a common name in those communities.
"When I grew up, it was a term of endearmen" he said. "I think it means buddy or friend."
In his Facebook post, Keigher said he was only playing off the previous commenter's remark. He thinks he's being unfairly scrutinized simply because he's a politician.
"I have been the same person my whole life and there's no racial intent in this in any way," he said. " I'm just not going to mess with Arc anymore if she doesn't have a sense of humor. It's too bad it ruffled feathers because she ruffles feathers all the time"
Pushed by pop culture
Soon after Mazzariello moved here, an instructor of a legal class she was taking made a comment about "greasy Guinea food." Another person referred to her as a "dago," she said.
She has encountered such casual remarks often in public, and said she realizes many Italian Americans add to the problem by using the offensive terms themselves.
"I'm horrified by it," she said of shows such as "Jersey Shore" and "The Sopranos," which play up Italian American stereotypes. "We allow it every single day when we don't stand up and say "No, you're not going to say that about us"
Officials with agencies such as the National Italian American Foundation and UNICO National could not be reached for comment Tuesday. But the former group routinely tracks television programs and movies that ?inaccurately depict Italian Americans as uneducated buffoons, promiscuous party-goers, vain youth completely lacking self-respect, criminals and members of the mafia.?
Both the NIAF and UNICO National have condemned the use of terms such as guido and guidette.
Mazzariello said if Keigher doesn't apologize publicly on her Facebook page, she will voice her anger at the next county commissioners? meeting.
"I'm waging war" she said. "(Keigher) needs to tell all Italian Americans he's sorry. Not just me"
You can reach Michael Barrett at 704-869-1826.
With Email, Telephone, Fax, Address and Photo for all.
Arcangela M. Mazzariello Law Office  (704) 864-8883

Italian Wedding Test

Posted By: The Annotico Report, Italia Mia Network on July 13, 2010 in Annotico Report, Italy - Comments: No Comments »

I was a very happy man. My wonderful girlfriend and I had been dating for over a year, and so we decided to get married. There was only one little thing bothering me...     It was her beautiful younger sister.

My prospective sister-in-law was twenty-two, wore very tight mini skirts, and generally was bra-less. She would regularly bend down when she was near me, and I always got more than a nice view. It had to be deliberate. Because she never did it when she was near anyone else.

One day her 'little' sister called and asked me to come over to check the wedding invitations. She was alone when I arrived, and she whispered to me that she had feelings and desires for me that she couldn't overcome. She told me that she wanted me just once before I got married and committed my life to her sister.

Well, I was in total shock, and couldn't say a word.

She said, 'I'm going upstairs to my bedroom, and if you want one last wild fling, just come up and get me.'

I was stunned and frozen in shock as I watched her go up the stairs. I stood there for a moment, then turned and made a beeline straight to the front door. I opened the door, and headed straight towards my car.

Lord... And behold, my entire future family was standing outside, all clapping!

With tears in his eyes, my father-in-law hugged me and said, 'We are very happy that you have passed our little test. We couldn't ask for a better man for our daughter. Welcome to the family.'
 
And the moral of this story is:   Always keep your condoms in your car!

"Spaghetti and Matzo Balls – Fuhgeddaboudit!" – Off Broadway

The romantic comedy tells the story a nice Italian boy (Peter Marinaro) and Jewish girl (Jennifer Leigh Cohen) who fall in love at first sight - until their immigrant parents clash of cultural differences. Audiences are encouraged to exclaim "Oy vey!" and "Fuhgeddaboudit!” as they root for the young lovers to unite.

Among the memorable characters: Ms. Burger, Sarah’s Jewish-Buddhist mother; Tony, Sr., the old-school Italian father who loves "The Godfather" but hates Italian stereotypes; Fluenza, a beautiful and intelligent Italian-American princess; and Fuhgeddaboudit (yeah, that’s right), an outrageous Italian stallion " in his own mind.
It points out all of the stereotypes that people are throwing out there, like ‘Jersey Shore.’ That’s not what all Italian people are really like. Those reality TV shows really do skew and put out a bad name for Italians.

I’m a first-generation American (Peter Marinaro). My parents were both born in Italy, so they are Italian through and through, and they are nothing like that. For me, the play is funny and people laugh, but it’s structured in a way where they can go home with something to think about.

It’s a love story between a young couple being affected by stereotypes, and everything thing else outside their relationship. By the clashing of two different groups of people, you find the comedy. But at the end of the day it’s about figuring out what matters and what doesn’t.

Romance: From 'Oy Vey' to 'Fughgeddaboudit!'
Staten Island Live Rob Bailey; Sunday, July 11, 2010
Now that’s what we call a quick turnaround.

One month after graduating from Wagner College’s nationally ranked theater program, 22-year-old Peter Marinaro was making his professional debut in "Spaghetti and Matzo Balls - Fuhgeddaboudit!" , a new play by David Lamb, author of the long-running off-Broadway hit "Platanos & Collard Greens."
The romantic comedy tells the story a nice Italian boy (Marinaro) and Jewish girl (Jennifer Leigh Cohen) who fall in love at first sight — until their immigrant parents clash of cultural differences.

Drama Desk Award winner Renee Lynette Ferrera directs the romantic comedy, which closes July 23, at Manhattan’s Baruch Performing Arts Center. Audiences are encouraged to exclaim "Oy vey!" and "Fuhgeddaboudit!" as they root for the young lovers to unite.

Among the memorable characters: Ms. Burger, Sarah’s Jewish-Buddhist mother; Tony, Sr., the old-school Italian father who loves "The Godfather" but hates Italian stereotypes; Fluenza, a beautiful and intelligent Italian-American princess; and Fuhgeddaboudit (yeah, that’s right), an outrageous Italian stallion " in his own mind.

 Earlier this week we talked to Peter Marinaro about his S.I. connection, how Wagner prepared him to go pro and the challenges/rewards of battling ethnic stereotypes.

Q.We know you went to school on Staten Island, but are you actually from the borough?


A.I actually come from a really small town called East Fishkill, NY, but I live in Brooklyn now.

Q.Can we assume you were drawn here by one of the top-ranked theater schools in the country, one that’s affectionately called the “Broadway Factory” by some industry insiders?

A.Well, the faculty at Wagner College is just amazing. They really taught not just me and all my classmates, but every one who graduated before us, so much. Although my training wasn’t in musical theater, it prepared me to tackle so many different facets of theater. The program is great because it’s so well-rounded — it prepares you for everything. And now Tony winner Michelle Pawk is joining the faculty. The program is evolving more and more. I wish the best for people going through the program now.

Q.OK, less than a month after picking up your diploma you were making your off-Broadway debut. Any advice for aspiring actors?

A.I just a saw a posting online, went into the open audition and they hired me. I’ve been working on this since the beginning of May.

Q.With all the brouhaha over the "Jersey Shore," Italian-American groups are really gunning against portrayals of negative stereotype in pop culture. Were you worried about tackling a role that walks that comedic tightrope?

A.If anything, this show fights against that. It points out all of the stereotypes that people are throwing out there, like ‘Jersey Shore.’ That’s not what all Italian people are really like. Those reality TV shows really do skew and put out a bad name for Italians.

I’m a first-generation American. My parents were both born in Italy, so they are Italian through and through, and they are nothing like that. For me, the play is funny and people laugh, but it’s structured in a way where they can go home with something to think about.

It’s a love story between a young couple being affected by stereotypes, and everything thing else outside their relationship. By the clashing of two different groups of people, you find the comedy. But at the end of the day it’s about figuring out what matters and what doesn’t.

Q.These days, it seems like more and more shows that start out as short-run productions — from “In the Heights” to “Rock of Ages” — actually go on to longer runs.

Right now it’s scheduled through end of July, but they’re in negotiations for an extended run. We’re still getting a feel for the audiences, and along way, tweaking things and trying to make the show even better. After July, we’ll see what happens, but they seem confident.
 

Italy: A Nation of Schindlers – Risking Death to Save Jews During WWII

It Happened in Italy: Untold Stories of How the People of Italy Defied the Horrors of the HolocaustIt Happened in Italy: Untold Stories of How the People of Italy Defied the Horrors of the Holocaust by Elizabeth Bettina.
 
The story below, of the happening in the small mountain town of Campagna, is only a small example, a small slice of the Heroic efforts of Italians , at the risk of their own lives, to save Jews,after the Nazis took control of Italy.
 
One Quibble I have with Bettina is that NOT ONE of the 50,000 ITALIAN CITIZEN JEWS were ever at the risk of death, and it was only 10,000 JEWISH REFUGEES from Germany and Eastern Europe that had fled to Italy, that were captured by the Nazi's and sent back to Germany by the Nazis,and of those only 2,000 survived.
 
Some will say that is poppycock. There were a number of Italian Citizen Jews that were imprisoned or worse. YES, But NOT because they were Jews, BUT because they were Much too loudly Anti Fascists, as were a number of Catholic, and Protestants, NOT because they were Jews. Catholic Priests were Shot and Killed on the spot for harboring Jews.   
 
Author Revisits Italian Heroes of the Holocaust
North Eastern Pennsylvania Times Leader; Janine Ungvarsky; July 11, 2010 
She calls it a little known story of goodness, the story of what happens when people quietly choose to do the right thing because it’s the right thing. It’s the story of how the people of Italy " and in particular, the inhabitants of the small mountain town of Campagna " knowingly and willingly risked their lives to save hundreds of Jews from the worst horrors of the Holocaust. It’s a story that has been largely unknown for decades, and that’s something Elizabeth Bettina wants to change.
 Elizabeth Bettina tells the story of how the people of Campagna, Italy knowingly and willingly risked their lives to save hundreds of Jews from the worst horrors of the Holocaust.
Bettina has written It Happened in Italy: Untold Stories of How the People of Italy Defied the Horrors of the Holocaust. On Tuesday, Bettina will speak as part of the Summer Experience at the Jewish Community Center of Wyoming Valley. The two-day event also features an evening panel discussion with three local businessmen and World War II veterans. "Memories to Guide our Next Generation: Heroes We Know" will highlight the war-time experiences of Harold Rosenn, Arnold Rifkin and Alvin "Buddy" Rothstein moderated by WVIA President Bill Kelly.
JCC event Chair Connie Roth said her husband pointed out Bettina’s book to her in Barnes & Noble bookstore. "I was very taken by this story," Roth said. "We don’t always know about those who truly put their lives in jeopardy to save the lives of Jewish people. Elizabeth’s book is a wonderful tale of these humble, caring, loving people in Italy that sheltered the lives of other human beings at great risk to their own. We need to know more".
The story of the heroic efforts of the Italians is one that Bettina speaks about with great passion. But even though she visited her ancestral homeland frequently beginning in childhood, it’s one that she didn’t hear about until recently.
Her passion was sparked by a photo taken in the 1940s on the steps of a Campagna church that Bettina had attended many times. Staring out of the fading black and white image, some wearing a slight smile, were a priest, several police officials, a number of townspeople - and a rabbi.
“I saw this and I said, ‘What was a rabbi doing in my grandma’s village, in this sleepy little village that the world never heard of?’ I would never think of that and the answer that came was that the people helped a few Jews escape the Nazis," Bettina said.
Bettina soon learned that "a few" was actually more like hundreds, perhaps even thousands of Jews. She was surprised to discover that through the efforts of many Italians " including government officials" Italian Jews and Jews who fled to Italy from other parts of Europe were given new identities, helped to escape beyond the reach of the Germans, or housed in camps that were more like hotels than the death camps in other parts of Europe.
“I couldn’t believe it," Bettina said. "You can’t find this town today with a GPS or Mapquest. How did these people get down here from Munich and other parts of Europe to escape the Nazis? And Campagna has 10 or 15 churches and this church where they are standing in the photo isn’t just any church, it’s my grandma’s church, where I used to fill water bottles in the fountain in front of the church. I just couldn’t believe it.
“I never wrote a book. I never wanted to write a book. It was not on my to-do list but when I found this story, the book just happened," Bettina continued. "It was a story of goodness that just had to be told, and I told it like it was told to me."
And though she didn’t want to write a book, Bettina seemed to be uniquely qualified to write this one. Besides her Italian background and frequent visits to the very town and church at the root of much of the story, she also grew up an Italian Catholic in a predominantly Jewish neighborhood in New York. She writes of showing the photo of the rabbi to one of her Jewish childhood friends.
“We always knew you were an honorary Jew" the friend said. "Now we know the reason you grew up in a Jewish neighborhood. Who else could understand the story of Jews and Campagna?" Bettina wrote in her book.
“The story of the people of Italy is like the story of Oskar Schindler" Bettina said, referencing the German factory owner immortalized in the book and movie "Schindler’s List" for saving hundreds of Jews, "Only this was a nation of Schindlers"
Her research revealed that while 80 percent of the Jewish people in Europe were killed by the Nazis, 80 percent of those in Italy survived. Bettina began to seek out those who lived through this extraordinary time and gather their stories.
Her book takes readers through her discoveries and introduces them to some of the key players, like Giovanni Palatucci. Palatucci was an Italian police official under the authority of Benito Mussolini who deliberately defied orders and prevented the deportation of thousands of Jewish people to Nazi concentration camps—and died in one himself for his efforts. The book tells Palatucci’s tale and describes the circumstances of Bettina’s almost unprecedented visit with Cardinal Camillo Ruini, the man who made Palatucci a candidate for Roman Catholic sainthood.
The book contains pages of photos of people having picnics, children at school and even weddings, providing a glimpse into life in the Italian internment camps that is a far cry from the horrendous images of Nazi camps in other parts of Europe.
It backs up the stories of the survivors with copies of letters and official documents that show the risks the people of Italy took to protect Jewish people, most of whom were strangers to them. But mostly, it tells the tale of those who lived through this time, often in their own words.
“They all have the same thing " gratitude," Bettina said. "They all speak fluent Italian, they feel like they are Italian, so much so that many of their children don’t realize they weren’t always Italian. And the Italians are so modest. They didn’t think they were heroic, they just saved human beings like them. That’s why you haven’t heard about this before"— the Jews who were in Italy tell me they feel that they are so lucky compared to those who were other places that they don’t talk about their experience. They just went on with their lives. And the Italians just feel that they were doing what people should do, so they didn’t talk about it either."
But Bettina is determined to tell the story. She has spoken all over the country, invited by people intrigued by this little known tale. She’s heard from dozens of other Jewish survivors who were in Italy and their families and is currently working on a documentary telling the stories of the many survivors she’s found, including Ursula Korn Selig, who will accompany her to the JCC event.
“I want this story to be told," Bettina said. "Scholars have written about this but it hasn’t filtered down. It would be nice for people to wonder what else they don’t know. And I want people to start to listen to those who lived through things like this. Don’t filter what they say. Listen to them and they’ll be delighted to talk to you.
“And I would hope that people would learn from what the Italians did. You can make the world a better place and it can be something as simple as getting up on a bus and giving someone a seat on a bus. If you want things to be different, you can make them different. That’s what the Italians did. I hope people wonder what they would do if they had been there in Italy. What would you do if it was you?"

Italy Invaded by US Celebrities on Vacation

Mike Tyson in Italy Promotion Tour;  Ryan Seacrest & Julianne Hough Kissing Photos Taken in Italy; Emily Blunt Weds John Krasinski in Lake Como, Italy, (at Geo Clooney's Home); Sofia Vergara flaunts her white-hot bikini body while vacationing in Italy, Jessica Simpson's Celebrates 30th Birthday Bash In Italy. Heather Graham Shows Off Her Bikini Body and Boyfriend in Italy.
Huge success for Mike Tyson in Italy
EastsideBoxing.com July 11, 2010
Even 5 years after he retired, Mike Tyson is still very popular in Italy. That’s why the former world heavyweight champion on a promotional tour of the Northern and Central areas of the country. On Friday July 9 International Federation of Sports Movies and TV President Franco Ascani gave Tyson the "Ghirland d’honneur”, a prestigious award which in the past was given to such sports legends as Pele. Also at the Just Cavalli Cafe, OPI 2000 President Salvatore Cherchi, with his son Christian, former WBC World cruiserweight champion Giacobbe Fragomeni and welterweight prospect Antonio Moscatiello. Tyson was happy to shake Fragomeni’s hand and pose with him for a photo.
When asked to do the same by a visibly thrilled Moscatiello, Tyson’s answer was: "You are a fighter, you are welcome". On the same night, a special event for Tyson. Hundreds of fans showed up to meet the boxing legend and commentate with him the images of his most famous fights which where showed on a mega-screen. On Saturday July 10, Stefano Pugnali brought Tyson to San Giovanni Teatino, in the Abruzzi region of Central Italy, where thousands of people filled "Parco dei Cigni" (Swan’s Park) a mega-discoteque built inside a beautiful natural park.
http://www.eastsideboxing.com/news.php?p=24394&more=1

Tyson's father, Jimmy Kirkpatrick, abandoned his family when Tyson was 2, leaving his mother, Lorna Smith Tyson to care for them on her own. The family lived in Bedford-Stuyvesant until their financial burdens necessitated a move to Brownsville when Tyson was 10 years old. Smith died six years later, leaving 16-year-old Tyson in the care of boxing manager and trainer Italian American Cus D'Amato, who would become his legal guardian. Tyson has been quoted saying, "I never saw my mother happy with me and proud of me for doing something: She only knew me as being a wild kid running the streets, coming home with new clothes that she knew I didn't pay for. I never got a chance to talk to her or know about her. Professionally, it has no effect, but it's crushing emotionally and personally."
Throughout his childhood, Tyson lived in and around high-crime neighborhoods. According to an interview in  His first fight was with a bigger kid over his mistreatment of one of Tyson's birds.He was repeatedly caught committing petty crimes and fighting those who ridiculed his high-pitched voice and lisp. By the age of 13, he had been arrested 38 times.
Tyson lived with Cus D'Amato and wife, and was treated like as son, and gave him the Love, Encouragement and Guidance he never had.
When Cus died at 78 November 4, 1985, Tyson's record was 11-0.(all by KO) Tyson continued to win extending his streak to 37-0, during the next 18 months before losing to 42-1 underdog Buster Douglas. in July 1987, But it appeared Tyson life went into a downward spiral with the loss of his father figure, and thereafter was sent to prison for 4 years 


Sofia Vergara flaunts her white-hot bikini body while vacationing in ItalyNew York Daily News
says she doesn't plan to wear anything other than her bikini while in Italy. While "Modern Family" fans are dreading the show's summer-long hiatus, ..
http://www.nydailynews.com/gossip/2010/07/13/2010-07-13_sofia_vergara_looks_whitehot_while_flaunting_bikini_body_in_italy.html

Emily Blunt And John Krasinski Tie The Knot In Italy!
MTV.com
The happy couple had been staying at the Lake Como estate of George Clooney, John's "Leatherheads" costar (so that's how they know each other! ...
http://hollywoodcrush.mtv.com/2010/07/12/emily-blunt-john-krasinski-wedding-2/

Awww! Ryan Seacrest & Julianne Hough Kissing Photos Taken in Italy!
Hollywood Life (blog)
Ryan Seacrest & Julianne Hough Kissing Photos Taken in Italy! Lovebirds Ryan Seacrest, 35, and Julianne Hough, 21, were hardly playing coy as they were ...
http://www.hollywoodlife.com/2010/07/13/ryan-seacrest-julianne-hough-hot-and-heavy-in-italy/

Jessica Simpson's Celebrates 30th Birthday Bash In Italy
SleekGossip.com
It would make sense after the incredibly romantic birthday weekend she just had in Italy with her new beau.ex-NFL football player, Eric Johansen, No NOT Tony Romo.  The couple was seen kissing and cuddling all over Capri....
http://sleekfly.com/content/19973-jessica-simpsons-celebrates-30th-birthday-bash-italy
Heather Graham Shows Off Her Bikini Body and Boyfriend in Italy!
PopSugar.com (blog)
Heather Graham made the rounds at the Ischia Film Festival in Italy over the weekend, and this morning she showed off her impressive figure in a pink bikini with her boyfriend Yaniv Raz ...
http://www.popsugar.com/Heather-Graham-Shows-Off-Her-Bikini-Body-Boyfriend-Italy-9093525

Psychic "World Cup" Octopus Is Italian, Not German or British.

Posted By: The Annotico Report, Italia Mia Network on July 12, 2010 in Annotico Report, Italy - Comments: No Comments »

Paul the Octopus, the "psychic" octopus, located in a German Aquarium, has accurately predicted seven out of seven 2010 FIFA World Cup games, including the final which saw Spain beat the Netherlands 1-0.
 
Paolo's official biography claims he is two-years-old and came from Weymouth, England before being moved to a German aquarium. Paolo's trainer, Verena Bartsch, said he was caught in the sea off the Italian island of Elba near Tuscany in April when he was four weeks old.

Italians Claim "Paolo" the Psychic Octopus 
ONE News from Reuters; Monday July 12, 2010
Octopus "Paul", better known as the so-called "octopus oracle" sits on a football
Paul the "psychic" octopus is reportedly not a Paul at all, with Italian media claiming him as Paolo the Italian octopus.
The octopus, who has shot to fame predicting the 2010 FIFA Football World Cup winners, was reportedly caught in Italian waters according to his trainer in Germany.
The Sydney Morning Herald said Italian media claim the octopus' name is Paolo, not Paul, and that he is Italian, not English.
Italian media are calling this a small glimmer of satisfaction for the country at the end of a tournament that has given them little joy.
Italy were taken out in the first round, finishing bottom of what they initially saw as an easy group.
Paul/Paolo's trainer, Verena Bartsch, said he was caught in the sea off the Italian island of Elba near Tuscany in April when he was four weeks old.
This conflicts with Paul's official biography which claims he is two-years-old and came from Weymouth, England before being moved to a German aquarium.
The "psychic" octopus has accurately predicted sevent out of seven 2010 FIFA World Cup games, including the final which saw Spain beat the Netherlands 1-0.
He makes his choice from two boxes, each containing a mussel and the flag of the two competing teams.

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